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20121202
20121210
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KQED (PBS) 34
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
a high-profile misconduct lawsuit involving a group of cops known as the riders. now city leaders are hoping a last-minute tentative deal will avoid a federal takeover of the department. matthai kuruvila, i know you've been covering this story. what are the details of this settlement and what does it mean for the department? >> well, what this agreement involves is an agreement between the police union, the city and professors attorneys who filed this original civil rights lawsuit. what they've decided on is creating a compliance director. now, this would be a quasi mayor of oakland in a sense in that he gets to -- he or she would have the power to fire the police chief with the court approval. they would have the power to direct the city administrators. those are two things currently only the mayor has. it's limited in scope in that it would only effect the reform tasks that are incomplete for the police department. the city had been very concerned that this potential receiver, or federal receiver, would have oversight over the entire police department. so all -- so all three sid
-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to figure out what is the right size of the industry. >> reporter: still, economists say citi's action today is not the start of a new wave of mass layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
. only a few roads are available. and going out of the city into the suburban areas that are held by the free syrian army. what you can see is a deterioration in the position of the regime and the strain of war as well. will that result in and trying to somehow do a deal? i do not know. but i know that a political deal is the only real choice the syrians have. if they do not get that, they face a long and bloody war. >> today, we have the american and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. a
"middleton," similar to "city island." arturo wrote the music for it. we are good buddies. tavis: let me go back to the story of the movie, "a dark truth." you play a talk show host that is a former cia agent. did you ever imagine yourself, given your views on the world, being -- >> cia? tavis: being a political talk show host. >> no, no. tavis: you do have views, though. >> we all have views. i choose to live my life as a bomb maker, as an artist. that is what i am interested -- as a filmmaker, as an artist. that is what i am interested in. we all have political views. we are interested in how the world affairs, and how we treat each other as human beings. but the political scene has no interest to me. people try to suck you in. unfortunately, i have an situations where there have been statements out there, in this modern day of the internet, when people were making statements as though you were making them. i had to shut down 6 facebook pages making statements i have never made. how you control that? there is no respect about each other's privacy. it is a free-for-all. i am sure you have
is that the city center. armed rebels are in parts of the ring around damascus. this is one of them. the rebels to film to this, and any civilians who have not escaped, have been shelled in the last few days. they keep the rebels back from this strong. . bbc was invited in to visit the detention center run by air force intelligence. we were not allowed to see the cellblocks. human rights groups say torture happens here. they paraded six prisoners. they said they were not speaking underdressed. the governor said any doubters were making the wrong assumptions about syria's secular state. syrian state tv was in the room to film. none of the men had been in court. all have confessed to being in al qaeda-style groups. >> the main work is making explosive devices to plant. >> they produce the algerian passport of this person, who said he was also a french citizen. >> i decided to do something for the children of syria, for the families and the powerless. i decided to join the jihad rather than crying in front of my tv. >> he would not answer when i asked if he had been tortured. two said there were p
was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we shall go on to the end. we shall fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the chu
ós captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >>. >> getting ready. >>. >> by military forces it would be some change in the chemical weapons whether they wanted to move them or whether they plan if syrians have always said they will not use these weapons on their own people. do they now -- go ahead. >> that's right and president obama in august clearly delineated those red lines that if they were to move these out of their storage site or to employ them against the syrian people or anyone else that would be a trigger point for some type of western action. now, depending -- the pentagon has drawn up preliminary plans to send as many as 75,000 troops into syria to secure these chemical weapons sites, but as of just today there have been no signs that any of those forces have been put on alert or there was any detail planning to do this. so there was some question here of whether assad may be calling t president's bluff. >> rose: and what exactly do you think they would be prepared to do and what would trigger that? clearly t
of the most visited holiday landmarks in the city. and tom, the big board's tree is embroiled in a twitter battle for bragging rights as the city's best with another famous tree, the one at rockefeller center.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees are tweeting? is that right? >> susie: not quite right, and those trees are a little too high for me to reach to put an ornament. that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, december 4. have a great evening, everyone, and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at nbr.com, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >>> it all started with a single lemon squeezer, and now 30 years later, bonnie grossman's house is filled with collections of all kinds. kitchen utensils, medicines, walking sticks, bottle whimsies, quilts, tramp art, little houses, and the work of self-taught artists, like alex maldonado. for bonnie, each
's years. that is the worst feeling. it is corrosive and in cities to be writing a song, and half with through -- maybe you are excited about the song. maybe it is meaningful to you. halfway through, you go, they are not going to like it. it is deflating. it is really hard to not be affected by it. i like to feel i am a person who says, i do not care what other people think. i think the act of being a musician is so much about being open and empathetic, and not having these boundaries. you cannot control some of the negative stuff that comes in. i feel like i should not have been affected by that, but i admit that i was, and i have them, in other ways. i have been. it is a terrible feeling to go, i thought this was pretty good, but it is not going to be good in the right way. maybe good is just not interesting. tavis: i hear that wrestling, and yet i am trying to figure out, for you, and even for myself -- everyone of us is an artist in our own right in something. you have to figure out where that line is. on the one hand, you cannot totally not care. you cannot be devoid of that
-- and crash to the road below? and why had the tunnel past the city in best -- passed the safety inspection just months ago? >> they will quickly take measures to prevent similar accidents. >> that work began with a hammer and chisel. across japan, there are thought to be at least 49 tunnels of similar age and designed to the one that collapsed. it will take a lot of workers an awful long time to check every inch of every one like this. the question people are asking here is why wasn't it done before. bbc news, yoky -- tokyo. >> it is nearly 25 years since saddam hussein's forces killed thousands of iraqi kurds with chemical weapons. now the kurdistan regional government is trying to establish the attack as an internationally-recognized act of genocide. they are seeking help to dig up and identify the dead. we have one of the first journalist to report from the scene. he has returned to assess the continuing fallout. >> i would not have recognized the place. it is now busy and expanding fast. however bustling it may be, no one here forgets the gas attacks of march, 1988. saddam hussein's pl
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countries, friends and allies. the death of bin laden signifies the most significant achievement to date in our effort counterterrorisms professionals to work tire loalsly to achieve this outcome. the american people do not see their work nor know their names but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and the result of their pursuit of justice. >> rose: that was president obama in may announcing the killing of america's most wanted terrorist. a new film about to be released by the oscar winning director kathryn bigelow and screen writer mark boal examines the ten-year hunt for bin laden. it is called zero dark thirty,
staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was fully formed. the u.s. has raised concerns that china, russia, and others will seek new limits on
, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert gates is here, hhe has had a distinguished career in public service spanning six decades and served under eight presidents from lyndon johnson to barack obama. >> he took the top job in 1991 under george h.w. bush, president of texas a & m university from 2002 to 2006 when president george w. bush appointed him secretary of defense. president obama asked him to stay at the pentagon making him the first defense secretary to serve in both a republican and the democratic administration, he left his post in june, 2011. at his farewell ceremony president obama awarded him the presidential award of freedom. >> the highest honor. >> this is a man i have come to know and respect. a humble american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply one of our nation's finest public servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical w
to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the first time in 37 years. he had never been to gaza in his life but after kissing the tarmac apparently sobbing as he did so khaled meshaal said gaza had always been in his heart. there to greet him were the al qassam brigades. named after an arab rebel leader killed by the british in the 1930s. 80 years on the fight for self- rule isn't over. and thousands turned out to watch meshaal's cavalcade crawl through gaza city just days after a war with israel which left around 160 palestinians dead. >> the second was when i was
york city's lincoln center, ford introduced the new lincoln mkz sedan, one of four luxury, and fuel efficient models coming out over the next four years. >> no one offers a car that's more fuel he fishant than the this hybrid no one offers a vehicle with the kind of craftsmanship and beautifully skimp find interior that we val. and when you drive it, it's going to be as fun to drive as a bmw but as quiet and comfortable at a lexus. >> susie: this is ford's latest campaign to stage a comeback for lincoln. when i talked to the c.e.o. alan mall ally i asked him if this is his last push to save the brand. >> we haven't focused on lincoln over the last few years because we had these other luxury brands. i think this is almost a beginning because now everybody knows that what ford did with ford, and now they all know ford is going to be 100% laser focused on lincoln. >> susie: when people think of a luxury car they think mercedes, bmw, not a lincoln. so how are you going to compete against those upscale brands? >> less than ten years ago lincoln was the number one luxury brand in the unit
that cities have announced 11,000 job cuts, is this the beginning of a trend, mark. >> no, susie, i don't think so. if washington can reasonably address the fiscal issues and i'm still confident that they will ultimately get it together. there will be a fair amount of -- but at the end of the day they'll get it together. if they're able to do that when we get into next spring, i do think we're going into much better shape. businesses will get it back and certainly investor will be happy about that. by this time next year i think we should see a much better job market because the housing whichs already starting to turn should be in full swing. so no, i don't think businesses are going to pull back. the only reason they would is if washington completely because this. at this point i don't think that's going to happen. >> susie: how do you think the federal reserve is going to read in today's jobs report. they're meeting on tuesday as you know. do you think it's going to trigger any new response from the fed? >> well, as you know the fed's on high alert. they've got their foot to the acce
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: maestro gustavo dudamel is here, berlin philharmonic once called him the most astonishingly talented conductor industry ever come across. he is beloved bolivar orchestra in vendz well, ven venezuela anw is with the la philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad,
the whole city. >> "al qaeda in yemen." >> frontline continues online. explore the reporting on "cell tower deaths" from our partners at propublica, more about who's responsible for a worker's safety from osha's jordan barab, and read at&t's statement to frontline. get insights into working at mf global from a former broker. >> sipping the kool-aid at that time. >> learn more about the volckr rule, and follow frontline on facebook and twitter, or tell us what you think at pbs.org/frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprpr
when we begin. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. begin this evening with politic. less than a month remains for lawmaker to reach a deal before the fiscal cliff deadline. the whitehouse open sists tax rates must rise on higher incomes in order to balance spending cuts but republican leadership remains committed to extending the bush tax cuts for all a tax bracket. brainer offer his response to the president. in an interview with julianna goldman of bloomberg news obama called the boehner plan quote out of balance. >> i think that we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it's going to require what i talked about during the campaign which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks for example about $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> ro
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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